The Connection 18th Edition : Page 4

The Book Connection the connection your guide to better living A Health Dimensions Publication Publisher Rodell Jackson Managing Editor & Art Director Laurel Hostetler Graphic Design, Cover & Layout Victoria Vinton Coyote Press Graphic Communications Intern Jessica Malkin Contributors Anna Allen, Natural Living Source Judith Balian, Excoveries Georgi Jackson-Gehrke, M.A., CPT, Vitality Fitness Dr. Vic Kalman Wendy McDowell Healthy Life by Anne Penman I just finished reading three novels that were all writ-ten with a childÕs voice and with a child as the main character, so I thought I would recommend all three. House Rules by Jodi Picoult I have read many books by this author and all have been easy reads. This one particularly interested me because of the subject matter: autism and AspergerÕs syndrome. Picoult obviously did a lot of research and I found it to be fascinating. Similar to her other works, the book was written in the main characterÕs voice; this time a teenager with AspergerÕs who is accused of murder. The story reveals the struggle between the boy and his family, takes a tender look at a motherÕs love, and also gives some insight into the legal system. An unpredictable, interesting read.   Room by Emma Donoghue An unforgettable book because it is so very different. The story is told through the eyes of a five-year-old boy who has been imprisoned in a room with his mother his entire life. The boy, Jack, knows nothing of the outside world except for the stories his mother tells him. Besides being a quick and easy read, the tale is creative, imaginative and unique and, again, shows the love of a mother for her son. Advertising Information (877) 503-2477 or  Info@HealthDimensions.com   Queen of Palmyra by Minrose Gwin My book club had one of our lon-gest discussions about this particular novel, a powerful and disturbing book. Narrated by an eleven-year-old girl named Florence, the story tells what it was like to grow up in Mississippi during the racial tensions of the 1960s. Gwin is a remarkable writer; she makes you feel like you are right there with Florence, feeling the same conflicts of emotion that Florence does for various characters: her mother, father, caretaker, grandparents, and her caretakerÕs niece. I enjoyed the novel, even though it was disturbing. Ñ Rodell Jackson, Publisher  the connection  Editorial Offices Health Dimensions 2942 Harding Street Carlsbad, CA 92008 Tel: (760) 720-1779    Fax: (760) 730-4626 info@HealthDimensions.com www.HealthDimensions.com Printing by Creel Printing 18th Edition © Copyright 2011-2012 Health Dimensions The editorial content of  The Connection  is prepared in accor-dance with the highest standards of journalistic accuracy. Readers  are cautioned, however, not to use information from the maga-zine as a substitute for regular professional health care.

The Book Connection

I just finished reading three novels that were all written with a childÕs voice and with a child as the main character, so I thought I would recommend all three.<br /> <br /> House Rules<br /> <br /> by Jodi Picoult<br /> <br /> I Have read many books by this author and all have been easy reads. This one particularly interested me because of the subject matter: autism and AspergerÕs syndrome. Picoult obviously did a lot of research and I found it to be fascinating. Similar to her other works, the book was written in the main characterÕs voice; this time a teenager with AspergerÕs who is accused of murder. The story reveals the struggle between the boy and his family, takes a tender look at a motherÕs love, and also gives some insight into the legal system. An unpredictable, interesting read.<br /> <br /> Room<br /> <br /> by Emma Donoghue<br /> <br /> An unforgettable book because it is so very different. The story is told through the eyes of a five-year-old boy who has been imprisoned in a room with his mother his entire life. The boy, Jack, knows nothing of the outside world except for the stories his mother tells him. Besides being a quick and easy read, the tale is creative, imaginative and unique and, again, shows the love of a mother for her son.<br /> <br /> Queen of Palmyra<br /> <br /> by Minrose Gwin<br /> <br /> My book club had one of our longest discussions about this particular novel, a powerful and disturbing book. Narrated by an eleven-year-old girl named Florence, the story tells what it was like to grow up in Mississippi during the racial tensions of the 1960s. Gwin is a remarkable writer; she makes you feel like you are right there with Florence, feeling the same conflicts of emotion that Florence does for various characters: her mother, father, caretaker, grandparents, and her caretakerÕs niece. I enjoyed the novel, even though it was disturbing. <br /> Ñ Rodell Jackson, Publisher

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