FRONT of HOUSE December 2012 : Cover

New Ottawa Bluesfest Reports Point to Wind Wall Ties as Key Factor in Collapse OTTAWA, Canada — Although Ontario Ministry of Labor ofcials issued a report earlier this year fnding no evidence of structural defects that led to the July 18, 2011 collapse of the overhead stage struc-ture during a Cheap Trick performance at the Ottawa Bluesfest, newly-published de-tails cite the crew’s inability to quickly cut ties securing the structure’s fabric walls as a key factor contributing to wind loads on the structure as the storm hit the area. The Ottawa Citizen reported the new de-tails, some of which were obtained via free-dom of information legislation, in a story posted Nov. 19, 2012. Citing the portion of the Ottawa Min-istry of Labor report written by engineer Robert Molina, The Citizen noted that crew members had trouble cutting ties securing the side and rear wind walls to the truss as the storm approached. Most of the fabric was still lashed to the structure when gusts of at least 117 km/hour lifted it upward, then backward, away from the crowd, but still on top of band and crew members as the structural elements fell. The report cited structural design speci-fcations that call for the fabric wind walls to be released when winds exceed 80 km/hour. With those walls released, the structure itself should be able to withstand winds of up to 120 km/hour, the newspaper noted. The Citizen also interviewed crew mem-bers who were working on or near the continued on page 5 PEOPLE. PRODUCTION. GEAR. GIGS. DECEMBER 2012 Vol. 11 No.3 Making the Most of a Rare Opportunity Jeff fusco/Getty ImaGes Portable P.A. AES, OCA Alliance to Collaborate On Open Control Architecture Standard NEW YORK — The Audio Engineering Society (AES) and the OCA Alliance have jointly announced that an AES standards project has been founded to consider OCA, the Open Control Architecture, as a public standard for control and monitoring of professional media networks. The goal of this AES-X210 Open Control Architec-ture project is to produce a public, open and royalty-free communications protocol standard for reliable, secure control/moni-toring of interconnected audio devices in networks of two to 10,000 elements. When complete, it is hoped that the OCA standard will gain industry accep-tance and open a new era in standard-ized, interoperable control of devices from diverse manufacturers. OCA will be a control and monitoring (and not a media transport) standard, intended to operate seamlessly with existing media transport standards such as AVB, and the proposed AES-X210 protocol. “We are very pleased to collaborate with leading manufacturers in the OCA Al-liance on this standards project,” said AES Standards Committee Chair, Bruce C. Ol-son. In the coming months, the AES-X210 task group will render the current OCA 1.1 specifcation into standards form and to shepherd its processing through AES’ open standards process. Interested individuals are encouraged to participate. For more info, visit aes.org/standards or oca-alliance.com. QSC’s K12 Series The gear may be portable, but the category required some heavy lifting. There are so many Portable P.A. products out there that it took three pages for us to cover it all. George Petersen’s Buyers Guide report starts on page 31. With eight Grammy awards along with Oscar, Emmy and Tony honors, Barbra Streisand is one of the biggest talents in showbiz. But even with her 2012 Back to Brooklyn tour, a 12-date run, the total number of her live tour performances over a six-decade span has yet to break triple digits. If her stage anxiety is as legendary as her voice, Clair tour chief Bob Weibel, FOH mixers Kevin Gilpatric and Chris Carlton, orchestral mixer Steve Colby and monitor engi-neers Ian Newton and Blake Suib worked to provide reassurance with fawless audio support. She’s pictured here with Audio-Technica’s AEW-T5400. For more, turn to page 28. Tech Feature 26 mathematical insights can be used to better understand frequency responnse. Phil Graham shows how Joseph Fourier’s Road Test Meyer Sound and VUE Audiotechnik Settle Lawsuit BERKELEY and ESCONDIDO, CA — Meyer Sound and VUE Audiotechnik have settled a lawsuit that Meyer fled last June against VUE. “Meyer Sound alleged VUE infringed Meyer Sound’s iconic wave trademark, and asserted other claims against VUE and a former Meyer Sound employee currently working for VUE,” Meyer noted, in a press release. “We are pleased with the settlement,” said Helen Meyer, co-founder and executive VP. “It resolves issues related to our company’s valu-able trade secrets, and eliminates the possibil-ity that people might be misled into assuming that VUE or its products are associated with or endorsed by Meyer Sound.” In response, VUE Audiotechnik co-founder Jim Sides posted an “open letter.” Calling the lawsuit an “unexpected distraction,” Sides not-ed that “I left Meyer on great terms, and have nothing but gratitude for the opportunities presented to me during my tenure there.” Sides also noted that “VUE is forging entire-ly new ground through unique technologies utilizing beryllium-based transducers and ad-vanced subwoofer topologies.” Although VUE agreed to change the look of its company logo, other terms of the settlement agreement were not disclosed. 38 iPad, bring digital mixing to a new level? George Petersen has the answer. Does Mackie’s DL1608, coupled with an On the Digital Edge 39 David Morgan’s gift ideas for audio engi-neers range from fashionable (T-shirts) to practical (high-tech ear plugs). www.ProAudioSpace.com/join

New Ottawa Bluesfest Reports Point to Wind Wall Ties as Key Factor in Collapse

OTTAWA, Canada — Although Ontario Ministry of Labor officials issued a report earlier this year finding no evidence of structural defects that led to the July 18, 2011 collapse of the overhead stage structure during a Cheap Trick performance at the Ottawa Bluesfest, newly-published details cite the crew’s inability to quickly cut ties securing the structure’s fabric walls as a key factor contributing to wind loads on the structure as the storm hit the area.

The Ottawa Citizen reported the new details, some of which were obtained via freedom of information legislation, in a story posted Nov. 19, 2012.

Citing the portion of the Ottawa Ministry of Labor report written by engineer Robert Molina, The Citizen noted that crew members had trouble cutting ties securing the side and rear wind walls to the truss as the storm approached. Most of the fabric was still lashed to the structure when gusts of at least 117 km/hour lifted it upward, then backward, away from the crowd, but still on top of band and crew members as the structural elements fell.

The report cited structural design specifications that call for the fabric wind walls to be released when winds exceed 80 km/hour. With those walls released, the structure itself should be able to withstand winds of up to 120 km/hour, the newspaper noted.

The Citizen also interviewed crew members who were working on or near the 45-by-17-meter stage structure, rented to the festival organizers by Groupe Berger, in a separate story published Nov. 18.

That account depicted one crew member trying to use wire cutters to free the stage structure’s fabric walls, and another who, in desperation, stabbed the fabric itself with a knife and saw that panel rip open by the force of the wind.

Both Molina’s report and a separate report written by Ontario Health and Safety inspector Jason Gordon noted that the same stage structure had withstood strong winds from a storm the week before, right before The Black Keys were set to perform.

During that storm, crew members were able to quickly cut the fabric wall ties. Molina’s report suggests that on the night of the collapse, the fabric wall ties were of a different material, harder to cut with just a knife.

Molina’s report also cited “a number of construction irregularities” that, while “not a direct cause” of the collapse, “demonstrated poor workmanship in the assembly of the stage,” including column segments secured with fewer bolts than specified, and the use of bolts that were the wrong size.

Read the full article at http://digitaleditiononline.com/article/New+Ottawa+Bluesfest+Reports+Point+to+Wind+Wall+Ties+as+Key+Factor+in+Collapse/1258081/138540/article.html.

AES, OCA Alliance to Collaborate On Open Control Architecture Standard

NEW YORK — The Audio Engineering Society (AES) and the OCA Alliance have jointly announced that an AES standards project has been founded to consider OCA, the Open Control Architecture, as a public standard for control and monitoring of professional media networks. The goal of this AES-X210 Open Control Architecture project is to produce a public, open and royalty-free communications protocol standard for reliable, secure control/monitoring of interconnected audio devices in networks of two to 10,000 elements.

When complete, it is hoped that the OCA standard will gain industry acceptance and open a new era in standardized, interoperable control of devices from diverse manufacturers. OCA will be a control and monitoring (and not a media transport) standard, intended to operate seamlessly with existing media transport standards such as AVB, and the proposed AES-X210 protocol.

“We are very pleased to collaborate with leading manufacturers in the OCA Alliance on this standards project,” said AES Standards Committee Chair, Bruce C. Olson. In the coming months, the AES-X210 task group will render the current OCA 1.1 specification into standards form and to shepherd its processing through AES’ open standards process. Interested individuals are encouraged to participate.

For more info, visit aes.org/standards or oca-alliance.com.

Read the full article at http://digitaleditiononline.com/article/AES%2C+OCA+Alliance+to+Collaborate+On+Open+Control+Architecture+Standard/1258084/138540/article.html.

Meyer Sound and VUE Audiotechnik Settle Lawsuit

BERKELEY and ESCONDIDO, CA — Meyer Sound and VUE Audiotechnik have settled a lawsuit that Meyer fled last June against VUE. “Meyer Sound alleged VUE infringed Meyer Sound’s iconic wave trademark, and asserted other claims against VUE and a former Meyer Sound employee currently working for VUE,” Meyer noted, in a press release.

“We are pleased with the settlement,” said Helen Meyer, co-founder and executive VP. “It resolves issues related to our company’s valuable trade secrets, and eliminates the possibility that people might be misled into assuming that VUE or its products are associated with or endorsed by Meyer Sound.”

In response, VUE Audiotechnik co-founder Jim Sides posted an “open letter.” Calling the lawsuit an “unexpected distraction,” Sides noted that “I left Meyer on great terms, and have nothing but gratitude for the opportunities presented to me during my tenure there.”

Sides also noted that “VUE is forging entirely new ground through unique technologies utilizing beryllium-based transducers and advanced subwoofer topologies.” Although VUE agreed to change the look of its company logo, other terms of the settlement agreement were not disclosed.

Read the full article at http://digitaleditiononline.com/article/Meyer+Sound+and+VUE+Audiotechnik+Settle+Lawsuit/1258087/138540/article.html.

JH Audio

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